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…such is the theme of  MidemNet 2009, whose full programme is now avaliable here.

With recorded music sales still declining and attention the new currency, the artist-fan relationship is increasingly where the music industry’s true value lies. Record companies are no longer CD-sellers but managers of the entire experience between their artists – now brands – and their public, whatever the product, service or platform.

This issue will be at the centre of two days of debate come January 17 & 18 in Cannes. But in the meantime, what do you think? Is it now all about the fans, or was it ever thus? Will fans continue to pay for music products or services they perceive as truly valuable, or will they focus on whatever’s free? Have your say; please comment away!

MIDEM’s own conference programme – which notably looks at talent discovery, brands, publishing, management, law and more – is also available here.


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About Author

James Martin

James Martin is Head of Social Media for Midem organisers Reed MIDEM. This includes defining and rolling out Midem's social media strategy, editing midemblog, influencer outreach, developing Midem's fanbase of 75,000+ music professionals and more.

1 Comment

  1. From the explosion of Facebook and MySpace it became even clearer to me that people like to form groups/communities. The next step beyond that is smaller niche-focused communities rather than one large homogenous group.
    With the decrease in perceived value of digital goods like mp3s, PDFs, the value still remains in the ‘experience’ or the ‘relationship’. So if you want to monetize this relationship online, one great option I keep mentioning is to ‘sell access’ via a ‘membership site’ – a members-only area that you charge a monthly fee for fans to access.

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