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At the end of our MidemNet panel on data last week, we promised to list some resources here. With the help of our great panelists here are some resources to help you explore the wonderful (and important) world of artist and fan data.

Duncan Freeman of music industry analytics provider Band Metrics mentioned two books during our discussion:

Neil Cartwright of online music marketer Million suggests keeping an eye on these data sources and trends:

We will all get to watch fellow panelist Cory Ondrejka‘s theories and experience come to life on EMI.com and across the label group’s digital efforts as he settles in as the SVP, Digital Strategy of EMI Music.

Unfortunately, Eric Korman could not join us at Midemnet, but as the President of Ticketmaster he knows a lot about artist and fan data. He wrote with these data suggestions:

  • “At a fairly aggregated level, I think the iLike Charts are a great example of how talent can be viewed in the digital era. Unlike other charts, this chart is based on the actual listening patterns of millions of iLike registered users who have installed the iLike Sidebar for iTunes. As a result, you can watch bands climb in ranking from relative obscurity to national presence in real time. The one that stuck of out for me last year was Vampire Weekend. The band started gaining real traction on iLike, and I had not heard of them at the time, so I started to listen in. A few months later they played SNL, and the rest of the wave caught on. It was pretty cool.”
  • “Another interesting data source is the Demand It data from Eventful. This link goes to the artist page for Paramore on Evenftul. On it you can see that 150K people have “demanded” Paramore to play their specific town, and if you scroll down on the lower right you will notice “demand it” numbers for specific cities in the U.S., 4,900 people in Tampa for instance. What’s even cooler are the tools an artist has access to to make use of that data. Specifically upon log-in, Paramore after deciding to play a room in Tampa, could immediately email all 4,900 people in Tampa who requested they play there. So the Eventful data set can help bands/agents determine routing, and then the Eventful toolset can act as a great direct marketing vehicle to help ensure sell out.”

And on behalf of all of the panelists, I’d like to say thank-you to the Reed Midem team for putting together such a thoughtful and well run event. – Bruce Houghton Hypebot.com


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