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We hereby welcome Ruth Mortimer, associate editor of the UK’s Marketing Week, as a regular contributor to MIDEM(Net) Blog. Ruth, who also blogs here, will be providing her take on how music meets and mingles with marketing today. Please give her a warm welcome!

Hello everyone.

As I’ve been involved for a number of years with the MIDEM conference, I’ve decided to contribute a little information to the MIDEM(Net) Blog on music marketing.

While this week has been full of developments – including the news that Vodafone has signed a deal with Warner to offer music without anti-piracy software – one story really caught my eye.

Cadbury is celebrating its Dairy Milk brand’s new Fairtrade status with a music single and video – Zingolo. It features Ghanaian music star Tinny (the chocolate-maker’s cocoa beans come from farmers in Ghana). The track is produced by the firm’s Glass and A Half Productions and possesses the same irreverent tone as the brand’s current advertising, created by Fallon.

The single by Tinny not only appears in Cadbury advertising but a full version of the track is available on iTunes. You can see it on YouTube below.

It’s an interesting tie-up for both the artist and the brand. For Tinny, being associated with a large company like Cadbury can only expand his international reputation. Since it’s for a good cause – making trade fairer – there seem to be few credibility complications here for the artist.

For Cadbury, it is a lighthearted way to promote the company’s move to Fairtrade. The brand has been fairly quiet about the move, doing little beyond announcing it. This is a nice way to promote it with a community feel. The single suggests that the partnership between the chocolate brand and Ghana goes deeper on a cultural level than consumers might otherwise suspect.

It’s also a further sign of how important music is to Cadbury’s marketing at the moment. The last few adverts, from the drumming gorilla to trucks and wiggling eyebrows, have all hinged on musical tracks. It’s not as if Cadbury is becoming a full-scale record label as it’s only releasing Tinny’s track because it works well for the marketing campaign, but it’s certainly a growing commitment to music than we have seen from the brand in the past.

All in all, a nice tie-up. Will it change Tinny’s career trajectory? Well, it might give him a boost. And for Cadbury? A nice way to push its fair trading credentials and position the business even more favourably now that Kraft has come courting?


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