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Haynes and Ogle’s session saw them single out some of the best hacks made at various Music Hack Days over the past few years, and discuss how some have come viable businesses. Even those that weren’t made at a hack day, such as MidemNet Lab winner Jammbox’s Discovr app, were singled out as great examples of the hacking ethos: open source and constantly evolving.

They also notably discussed how one MIDEM Hack Day hacker was approached by an investor after having presented his hack in Cannes, no less; and the deal recently formed by Def Jam and the Echo Nest. Under the deal, all apps made using Echo Nest APIs and Def Jam content see their revenues split 50/50… and the rights fully cleared, of course. This is a crucial first answer to the recurring question asked of hackers: how do you deal with the rights of the content used in your hacks?

Finally, Haynes and Ogle gave tips to fellow startups on how to get noticed, especially at events like SXSW or MIDEM. Word to the wise!

(and yes, we’re still trying to work out how to film in widescreen: bear with us! 😉 )


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About Author

James Martin

James Martin is Head of Social Media for Midem organisers Reed MIDEM. This includes defining and rolling out Midem's social media strategy, editing midemblog, influencer outreach, developing Midem's fanbase of 75,000+ music professionals and more.

2 Comments

  1. First of all hackers means that someone is stealing your information and I’m sure the hacker community doesn’t like you guys using the name. Second as I said ,this might be good for somone in his bedroom but it don’t pay the rent and it allows the big dogs access to sounds they normally would pay for. You guys just took Microsofts Songsmith and cleaned it up. I’m surprised they don’t come after you.

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