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This July, EMI’s Insight division launched an unprecedented initiative to share data from their 850,000-interview Global Consumer Insight data.  This dataset covers 25 countries and over 7,400 artists, with twelve people being interviewed at any given moment, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

The data is being shared with the data science community in a range of initiatives including  forthcoming Music Data Science Hackcamps.

As hard data continues to be something of a scarce commodity for the streaming music debate, I decided to mine EMI’s dataset to create a snapshot of global streaming music adoption, and its influence on the broader music market.

I have written up a report which you can download for free here. Additionally EMI have given me permission to post the data here so that you can play around with it yourselves.  In fact I invite you to go and play around with the data and see if you can find any trends that I missed in my analysis.

Here are some of the key findings from the report (which of course, along with all of the opinions and interpretations are my own and are not, necessarily, EMI’s):

– Streaming has a firm foothold. 32% of consumers across the globe are now using streaming services.  However, adoption is far from uniform.

– Nordics lead the way. Norway and Sweden (home of Spotify) are respectively the 1st and 3rd most active streaming markets globally. Key to this trend is the relative sophistication of internet users in these markets. 48% of Norwegians are now streaming music users, as are 43% of Swedes.

– Streaming is a good fit for piracy-riddled Spain. Spain is the 2nd most active market with 44% streaming penetration. But whereas consumer sophistication was key to Nordic adoption, in Spain piracy and the legacy of free were the most important drivers.

– Free is a good fit for France too. The role of piracy and free have also been important in France. French authorities have pushed through the controversial Hadopi legislation but the carrot of Spotify and local streaming success Deezer has delivered immediate results.  Translating streaming usage into purchases though is less successful: just 13%.

– Purchase conversion rates are higher in lower penetration markets. The US, Canada, UK, Germany and Denmark have lower streaming penetration but these markets have much higher streaming-to-paid downloads conversion rates, averaging 23% of streaming users.

– Streaming Drives Music Discovery and Consumption. Although it is still too early to draw definitive conclusions about exactly how much streaming impacts piracy and sales, the case for driving discovery and consumption is much clearer. 55% of global streaming music users state that they now discover new artists and new music as a result of streaming.

– Usage is steady among existing users. Usage among existing streaming users is broadly steady with 19% using streaming more than 12 months previously and 20% more.

Download the complete report here.

 

This post was originally published on Mulligan’s blog, here.



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About Author

Research Focus Mark serves Consumer Product Strategy professionals. He is a leading expert on music and digital media. Mark came to Forrester through its acquisition of JupiterResearch, where he ran Jupiter's European research and data teams. Prior to joining JupiterResearch, Mulligan spent five years working in media consultancy and market research managing projects and delivering international projects. Previous Work Experience Mark came to Forrester through its acquisition of JupiterResearch. Mark joined Jupiter in May 2000. He regularly appears on TV, radio, and in the press, commenting on the European music industry, including BBC television and radio, ITV, CNN, BusinessWeek, The Economist, the Financial Times, The Guardian, and The Wall Street Journal Europe. He frequently speaks at conferences such as Popkomm, In the City, London Calling, and Midem. Mark was also a recording artist.