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The Midem Artist Accelerator (MAA) is an exclusive programme for artists and their entourages. Designed to support managers, agents, labels and publishers as they look to grow their artists’ profiles globally, it has seen countless up-and-coming acts play live on Cannes’ global stage: Al Bairre, Far From Alaska, Flo Morrissey, Koo Ntakra and Synapson, to name just a few.

Finalists are also offered advice and guidance from the MAA Artistic Committee, a panel of world-leading live and recorded music industry experts, which for Midem’s forthcoming 2017 edition include Dalse, head of Zandari Festa, Korea’s leading festival for international artists, and Snoot’s Laurence Muller, whose management roster notably includes French stars Phoenix (not to mention countless other industry moguls on the MAA committee, three of whom are interviewed here).

Muller says taking part in the committee last year proved “the beauty of my job”, as it allowed her to keep her “ear to the ground” as much with the MAA’s upcoming artists as with “other members of the committee who are all active in various areas of the music business that complement & enrich each other.”

Enjoy Muller & Dalse’s insights!

midemblog: What do you hope to bring to the MAA table this year?

Muller: I hope some of my experience will be valuable to others. I do enjoy sharing the knowledge I have amassed through the years, first as a record company as an international executive, and now in the broader field of artist management. I do hope to communicate some of the genuine passion I put into artist development. But it’s definitely not a one way street. I’ll never see myself as omniscient. I’m forever a learner and I give as much as i take!

Dalse: I will bring my expertise and knowledge about the Asian music scene and markets, as well as my years of experience running Zandari Festa. 


> What local band do you know of that could best inspire others in terms of going global?

Dalse: I think the best example of a band from Korea that has gone global is probably Jambinai. The band has a very unique style, sound and identity which quickly made them appealing to the international market. They also have a very strong sense of purpose and willpower which helped drive them on and not rest on their laurels.  

 

How do you advise artists to take advantage of technology – streaming, social media, etc – that previous generations of artists didn’t have?

Muller: The way music’s consumed today on streaming services — the cherry-picking approach — can still be slightly disturbing and sometimes frustrating for some of the acts whose efforts are on creating cohesive pieces of work. Namely albums that aren’t just compilations. Then again, one shouldn’t diminish the awareness artists can gain from the benefits of these nearly infinite & constantly available online libraries which can expose them at any time to millions of potential new listeners. If, of course, their songs are ace!

DalseI think it is important for bands to stay abreast of and take advantage of current social and cultural trends as well as current technologies. I tell bands to make sure that they can easily and clearly show their true identities, thoughts and of course their music using the latest technologies available to them. Using lots of different social channels can be useful to the bands, but I also think that focusing on just one and doing it correctly can be important as well. Which works best for the band depends on their individual preferences and desire to succeed.

 

Find out about the 2017 Midem Artist Accelerator here; you have until February 5 to submit your acts!

 


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About Author

James Martin

James Martin is Head of Social Media for Midem organisers Reed MIDEM. This includes defining and rolling out Midem's social media strategy, editing midemblog, influencer outreach, developing Midem's fanbase of 75,000+ music professionals and more.

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