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It’s spring, and a lot of fascinating numbers and reports are out in the music world. Whether you’re talking the bottom line numbers or leading edge music technology, the music business is roaring like a huge Marshall amplifier at a concert.

 

$17.3 billion was how much money in total was paid out to music artists and labels on a global scale in 2017, say new numbers just released by IFPI in its 2018 Global Music Report. That’s up over 8% from 2016. Calculations by industry insiders who studied the newly released numbers tell us that independent labels and music artists received $5.1 billion (29.88% of the total global revenues). But, in 2016, their share was 30.68%.

 

$500 million is just about how much money is made by self-releasing music artists who don’t work with any music label, according to Midia Research data. However, as AIM CEO Paul Pacifico explained to Music Business Worldwide, in trying to save money by going through the services that allow them very low-cost access to streaming services and digital music stores, these music artists may be taking part in a “false economy” and missing out on ways to expand their fan base, and their revenues, by failing to find the right, experienced commercial partners. Going with independent labels is likely much better than going it alone.

 

40 million subscribers are listening to Apple Music as of mid-April of this year. That’s pretty astounding in light of that number being reported as 38 million only about one month earlier. The sharp rise in subscriber numbers over a one-month period coincides with Apple promoting Oliver Schusser to the role of VP of Apple Music & International Content, making him Apple’s global music overseer. The question is, what’s the bigger story here?

 

$120 million was what music streaming service Spotify spent on acquisitions from 2014 to mid-2017, and then in April of 2018 Spotify acquired Loudr. Founded in 2013, the company creates tech to help “content creators, aggregators, and music services identify rights holders, secure mechanical licenses, and pay royalties to music publishers”. Adam Parness of Spotify calls Loudr “a true music innovation” in and of itself.

 

1.8 million music artists across 900 music genres spanning the globe have at least some of their fans’ shared data in the database of the Music Audience Exchange (MAX) company. MAX employs its proprietary technology named its Artist Matching Engine to utilise “neural networks to map music tastes onto the demographic, psychographic, geographic, and behavioral attributes of music audiences.” Survey questions asked of music listeners include “What role would you say music plays in your life?” and “Why do you listen to music?”

 

Bam!


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About Author

Brant David McLaughlin

Brant David McLaughlin has been a professional writer since 2005. At the behest of best-selling author Gina Smith, he began writing long-form journalism in January, 2014. He lives in the rustic town of Milford, New Jersey.

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